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SharePoint 2010 vs SP2010 + FAST vs SP 2013 Search Capabilities Comparison

Getting Started with Enterprise Search in SharePoint 2010 Products : General Enterprise Search Guidance for SharePoint 2010 oit2013-model-sharepoint-search-architecture: Search Architectures for SharePoint 2013 diagram sp-2013-enterprise-search-model: Enterprise Search Architectures for SharePoint 2013, includes hardware specs.

SharePoint Search Licensing Overview SharePoint licensing is a complex subject. As well as there being multiple product configuration options, license prices often depend on a number of factors such as the type of organization, the relationship with Microsoft and/or licensing retailer etc. As a general rule, if you are interested in giving all internal users access to FAST search via SharePoint 2010 Enterprise, you are looking at roughly twice the licensing costs of an installation using the standard features. In SharePoint 2013 Enterprise, FAST functionality is included in the Enterprise CAL’s. FAST Search for SharePoint 2010 is licensed separately so to take advantage of all the enterprise search features you will need additional server licenses for servers running the FAST Search software. It is also possible to use a single server for any of the above server licenses. For example if you wanted to run an Intranet and a public Internet website on the same server you could apply the SharePoint 2010 Server license as well as the SharePoint 2010 Internet Sites license to a single server. A FAST license can also be applied to a SharePoint 2010 server if required (saving hardware costs but still requiring SharePoint Server and FAST licenses). itgroove can offer specific license recommendations when the SharePoint version platform is decided. SharePoint 2013 Search Boundary Key Changes As perhaps a trade-off for the tight integration of FAST functionality into SharePoint 2013, there are some significant new restrictions in topology that should be known, as they affect search architecture planning: LimitSP 2010SP 2013Crawl Databases10 per Search Service Application5 per Search Service ApplicationCrawl Components16 per Search Service Application2 per Search Service ApplicationIndex Partitions20 per Search Service Application20 per Search Service ApplicationLink DBN/A2 per Search Service ApplicationQuery Processing ComponentN/A1 per serverContent Processing ComponentN/A1 per serverAnalytics Processing ComponentN/A6 per Search SA Although most organizations should be able to meet their immediate requirements for Search with a single Search Service Application (ideally on a single, dedicated SharePoint web application), these limitations should be noted for future expansion. This design sample shows the logical architecture and interaction of search components, and an example of a fault-tolerant server farm that provides enterprise search for a content corpus that contains approximately 40 million items:http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/p/?LinkId=259181

Topology Changes from SharePoint 2010 When designing your topology, it is important to understand what has changed since SharePoint 2010 Search and the performance of the components. Due to the technical changes some of them need to be ideally separated onto separate servers when scaling up or if you have a large search user base. In a small to medium farm of 2 to 4 SharePoint servers in SharePoint 2010, the recommendation was to place the query component on the web front end servers. In a medium sized search orientated farm it was recommended to have three physical tiers consisting of separate web front end servers, query servers and crawl servers. In SharePoint 2013, even with a small farm of two SharePoint servers it is recommended to place the query services on a separate server from the web front end server. The query and crawl services can run together on a separate server. This is applicable for up to four SharePoint servers but once you increase the number of servers, it is recommended to split out the query and crawl components onto their own servers and leave the remaining service applications together. Here's the official guidance on modifying your SharePoint Server 2013 Search Topology: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj862356(v=office.15).aspx Here's a couple more great posts from two stand-up guys on how to modify your search topology: Changing the SharePoint 2013 Search TopologyNew-SPEnterpriseSearchIndexComponent could not find part of the path error How you structure your architecture depends on what you intend to use it for, be it enterprise or for the internet. There are a number of considerations to take into account such as high availability, fault tolerance, the amount of content and the number of queries you will receive. The query processing component takes most of the load off the SQL server including disk space load and CPU, it therefore requires more local resources than in SharePoint 2010. The query processing component ideally, therefore, should be on its own dedicated server. The index component is equally resource hungry, because it performs two roles in communicating to the query processing component and the content processing component. The index is the main store of information from the crawled content and can be split into multiple partitions to scale up and provide fault tolerance. Another thing to consider, if you are crawling a large amount of data, it is advisable to have a dedicated web server for crawling. The diagram below is an extract from a TechNet article on topologies, which shows the optimum environment for search oriented environment:

Technical Diagrams for SharePoint 2013 SearchTitleDescriptionSharePoint Server 2013 Search

Zoom into the model in full detail with Zoom.it from Microsoft (best on desktop or laptop computers)Visio version (best for users with Visio)PDF version (best for mobile devices or tablet computers)This design sample shows the logical architecture and interaction of search components, and an example of a fault-tolerant server farm that provides enterprise search for a content corpus that contains approximately 40 million items. For more information, see the following articles:

  1. Overview of search in SharePoint Server 2013

  2. Plan enterprise search architecture in SharePoint Server 2013

  3. Scale search for Internet Sites in SharePoint Server 2013Enterprise Search Architectures for SharePoint Server 2013

Zoom into the model in full detail with Zoom.it from Microsoft (best on desktop or laptop computers)Visio version (best for users with Visio)PDF version (best for mobile devices or tablet computers)This design sample illustrates small, medium, and large-size farm architectures for enterprise search. It contains search and farm topology examples, scaling guidance, and hardware requirements. For more information, see Overview of search in SharePoint Server 2013.Internet Sites Search Architectures for SharePoint Server 2013

Zoom into the model in full detail with Zoom.it from Microsoft (best on desktop or laptop computers)Visio version (best for users with Visio)PDF version (best for mobile devices or tablet computers)This design sample provides guidance on the hardware requirements and performance considerations for Internet Sites search topologies. In addition, the model contains an example medium-sized Internet Sites farm. For more information, see Plan for Internet, intranet, and extranet publishing sites in SharePoint Server 2013.

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