Office 365 Internet Zone Settings

This is a follow-up to my 2015 post about the recommended IE Internet Security Zone settings for maximum user authentication happiness.

On the post http://www.tuomi.ca/2014/06/23/overcoming-sticky-logouts-office-365-azure-windows-intune-web-browser/, I tried to rationalize IE security settings relating to Office 365.

Here’s a good explanation of why we should care, as quoted from the more recent MSFT post:
“Starting with Windows Vista , Internet Explorer has a new security zone protection feature, called protected mode, and that is set up by default for Internet, Intranet and Restricted Security zones.

Understanding and Working in Protected Mode Internet Explorer

The effect of the protected mode is that the sites in these zones will not have access to the folders available to other application (i.e. data available in other zones). This means the cookies available for one session for a site in a Protected mode zone will not be accessible to a site that resides in a separate zone (and the other way around), which will trigger behind the scene repeated authentication attempts.”

Net result: persistent login prompts, hair pulling, annoyances. The fix? Either manually or through group policy, apply the following settings to your Windows workstations:

Trusted Sites Zone:
https://*.microsoftonline.com
https://*.sharepoint.com
https://*.sharepointonline.com
https://*.outlook.com
https://*.lync.com
https://*.office365.com
https://*.office.com
https://*.microsoftstream.com
https://*.sway.com
https://*.powerapps.com
https://*.yammer.com

Intranet Zone:

*.microsoftonline.com
*.sharepoint.com
*.sharepointonline.com
*.outlook.com
*.lync.com
*.office365.com
*.office.com
*.microsoftstream.com
*.sway.com
*.powerapps.com

 

 

References:
https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/victorbutuza/2016/06/20/o365-internet-explorer-protected-mode-and-security-zones/
– Latest new URL’s added e.g. PowerApps.com
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/2507767/problems-when-signing-out-of-office-365–azure–or-intune-in-a-web-bro – Original official reference.

 

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SharePoint Online Search Word Breaking

Recently I was asked if search in SharePoint Online would return two results for words separated by hyphens, dashes, or other characters. For example, we’d like to know if  entering the search phrase “committal” will return both “noncommittal” and “non-committal”

The answer is, it depends on the specific Search scenario and configuration. It’s indeed an under-documented topic so I thought I’d try and give you good context here.

  • SharePoint Online search “verticals” (Result Sources) determines the source of the search and characteristics of the query logic. We can also create Custom Result Sources.
  • Out of the box Result Sources, are mapped to Managed Properties, which are in essence “columns” of search data. As with Result Sources, there are out of the box managed properties, and we also can create our own.
  • The Search Query component tokenization process splits the stream of text retrieved from the managed properties into individual words (tokens) at the time of a query which includes word breaking, stemming, query spellchecking and the native thesaurus capabilities.
    • This tokenization will only take place if the following setting on the specific Managed Property being searched is turned off:
    • Since we cannot directly modify the out of the box Managed Properties, we are bound to whatever those properties have set for Complete Matching, as the first factor in Word Breaking being applied or not.

Here’s the inventory of the special characters used for tokenization in the context of using SharePoint Document Libraries as the Search Result source:

Character Is Wordbreaker?
– hyphen Yes
_ underscore Yes
. period Yes
& ampersand Invalid
% percent Invalid
+ plus Yes
# pound Invalid

There are other possible root content source types as well: File Share, Exchange and Open Search, and they have their own idiosyncrasies regarding word breaking. For example, ampersand would work as a word breaker in the context of a File Share search.

So, in conclusion, yes, a search of OOTB SP Document Libraries for “committal” will return both “noncommittal” and “non-committal”, with higher relevance given to an item with both portions of the string present.

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SharePoint Saturday Vancouver 2017 – Register Now



  • SharePoint administrators, end users, architects, developers, and other professionals that work with Microsoft SharePoint Technologies and Office 365 will meet for the 2nd annual SharePoint Saturday Vancouver on April 8, 2017 at UBC Robson Square located at 800 Robson St.

    Attendees will be able to register for a variety of sessions presented by seasoned speakers and Microsoft MVP’s presenting a wide range of SharePoint and Office 365 topics.

    Our Call for Sponsors and General Registration are CURRENTLY OPEN, so sign up for this FREE event today! We look forward to welcoming you all to another great day of learning, networking and fun!

    Location:
    UBC Robson Square located at 800 Robson St, Vancouver, B.C. Canada

  • Top 10 Digital Workplace design patterns

    Level: 100
    Track: End-User, Business
    Imagine a future where silo’d departments and legacy processes don’t stand in our way. Today’s collaboration needs go from complex collaboration portals to simple innovation hubs and most importantly need to work for our devices. Designing portals to enable a new kind of collaboration and communication is an absolute necessity today.
    For the past couple years, I’ve had the opportunity to study how successful teams collaborate and have helped to transform the way teams work and collaborate together. In this session, I’ll share what I’ve learned about making effective cross-discipline collaboration possible, and leave you with actionable approaches you can use to unite your team’s communication and collaboration needs.

    Speaker(s)

    Kanwal Khipple

    Founder & CEO, Office 365 MVP
    2toLead

    Coming Up with a Content Management Strategy for the New Digital Workplace

    Level: 100
    Track: End-User, Business
    How often have you heard “I can’t find anything in our organization” or “Can you send me X, I can’t find it” echo within your IMs and meetings? Chances are you are hearing this loud and clear from organizations of all sizes and structures. Planning content management in the new age digital workplace can seem like a daunting task – but it isn’t. In this session, I will lead you through a real life project with a global resource organization where I helped them plan a global content management strategy, by consolidating their content sprawl and aligning this strategy with the tools available with Office 365.

    Speaker(s)

    Zeshan Randhawa

  • App Modernization: Get your business apps cloud-ready

    Level: 200
    Track: IT Pro, Business
    Many enterprises which are using SharePoint as their corporate intranet have spent a lot of effort in creating custom business applications to support their internal workflows. Many of those custom business applications were created using Server-side code. As long as SharePoint ‘on-premises’ is used, those custom business applications work fine, but more and more enterprises are thinking about moving to the cloud, and when checking their options, they realize that Server-side code can not be used in Office365 anymore.
    This session provides a detailed overview on the options enterprises have when moving their custom business applications to the cloud and it also provides guidance on choosing the right option.

    Speaker(s)

    Oliver Wirkus

    Senior SharePoint Consultant
    Softlanding Solutions Inc.

    Coming Up with a Content Management Strategy for the New Digital Workplace

    Level: 100
    Track: End-User, Business
    How often have you heard “I can’t find anything in our organization” or “Can you send me X, I can’t find it” echo within your IMs and meetings? Chances are you are hearing this loud and clear from organizations of all sizes and structures. Planning content management in the new age digital workplace can seem like a daunting task – but it isn’t. In this session, I will lead you through a real life project with a global resource organization where I helped them plan a global content management strategy, by consolidating their content sprawl and aligning this strategy with the tools available with Office 365.

    Develop, complete and submit forms on your phone, and you can go anywhere.
    Level: 200
    Track: End-User, Business

    Today’s workforce is mobile, and if you want to get the best work out of your people, you need to give them every tool it takes to be productive on the go.

    You’ll learn how to bring forms and mobile together in your Nintex Workflow platform, helping you cut costs, save time, eliminate manual processes and boost productivity. You’ll also see how to:

    Give your team access to content from everywhere.
    Make it easier for your employees to collaborate.
    Keep your people productive when they’re not behind their desks.
    Any form. Any device. Anywhere.

    Demo/presentation illustrating how Nintex Workflow, Forms and Nintex Mobile lets you:

    1. Design forms quickly and easily.
    2. Generate forms for browsers, including tablets and mobile.
    3. Publish to the cloud in one click.
    4. Build comprehensive mobile business applications.
    5. Create and manage auditable workflows to automate and standardize your business processes

    Speaker(s)

    Robert Strickland

    Director SharePoint Services

  • App Modernization: Get your business apps cloud-ready

    Level: 200
    Track: IT Pro, Business
    Many enterprises which are using SharePoint as their corporate intranet have spent a lot of effort in creating custom business applications to support their internal workflows. Many of those custom business applications were created using Server-side code. As long as SharePoint ‘on-premises’ is used, those custom business applications work fine, but more and more enterprises are thinking about moving to the cloud, and when checking their options, they realize that Server-side code can not be used in Office365 anymore.
    This session provides a detailed overview on the options enterprises have when moving their custom business applications to the cloud and it also provides guidance on choosing the right option.

    Speaker(s)


    Dealing with slow performance in SharePoint Server

    Level: 200
    Track: IT Pro

    SharePoint is slow. Pages take ages to load. The throbber spins forever. “Working on it…” becomes the SharePoint motto.

    How can you tell if your SharePoint farm is under-performing? Why is it slow? What can you do to improve SharePoint’s performance?

    In this talk we’ll look at tools available to SharePoint and IT administrators to help them assess the performance of their SharePoint farm to come up with a plan for improvement.

    Speaker(s)


    Dive into PowerApps, building apps that mean business without writing code

    Level: 100
    Track: IT Pro, Business
    Building business applications is never easy. There are always conflicting priorities between IT and business and most apps don’t merit the time and cost of traditional software development. PowerApps is an enterprise application platform for delivering line-of-business apps without writing code. It fundamentally transforms and accelerates how organizations provide employees seamless access to business apps and information. PowerApps now features built-in support for the common data model, enhanced connectivity, support for more devices and integrations with other Microsoft business offerings. Learn how you can leverage PowerApps today and a sneak peek at what’s coming next.

    Finding a Needle in a Haystack SharePoint Style: Search Concepts and Content Quality
    Level: 200
    Track: IT Pro
    So you have this shiny new SharePoint environment built inside your enterprise. You have added tons of content and have lots of users adding, modifying and deleting content all the time. You’ve got your system purring like a kitten and everyone loves it except for one minor detail. Your users can’t find any of the content they are looking for. Search is just not working for them. If they don’t know exactly where to find a file they need to reference or work on, they are spending their precious time looking for it. Join us in this session where we will discuss the concepts that SharePoint Search is built on, why it likely isn’t working for you and what you can do to improve you ability to find the needle in your haystack – your content.

    Speaker(s)

    Joanne Klein

    SharePoint/O365 Consultant
    NexNovus

    How Expedia Deployed a Global Intranet to 20,000 users on SharePoint 2016

    Level: 100
    Track: IT Pro, Developer, End-User, Business

    Join Perry Underdown, Manager of SharePoint and Web Tools at Expedia and Michal Pisarek, Director of Product at Bonzai Intranet, to learn how Expedia recently launched a SharePoint Intranet to over 27,000 employees worldwide. Utilizing SharePoint 2016 and Bonzai Intranet, the travel-tech giant quickly deployed their new intranet across multiple continents to unite the organization and over 17 of its subsidiaries.

    In this engaging and interactive session, you will learn about the challenges Expedia faced in this massive undertaking. Specifically, Perry and Michal will focus in on the learnings that made the project a major success including governance, change management, and strategic execution. They will also uncover the technology and methods they used to cut costs and decrease the project’s time-to-delivery.

    This session is a must for anyone who wants to successfully deploy an Intranet on SharePoint or Office 365 or understand how to better leverage the platform for communication, collaboration and engagement.


    Mobile Era of Knowledge Management – Controlled Distribution is Vital!

    Level: 100
    Track: IT Pro, End-User, Business
    Mobile device use is here, and today’s enterprise must be agile enough to respond to rapidly evolving employee, client, industry and regulatory demands. In this new digital workplace, mobility plays a crucial role in enabling a highly productive workforce. The millennial workforce is mobile across geographies, time zones and devices. Mobile information governance involves securely enabling the right content to be available to the right people at the right time. Attend this session to learn how to distribute enterprise content in a controlled way – to both empower mobile collaboration, while governing mobile activity and content.

    Speaker(s)

    Riyaz Lakhani

    Director of Professional Services & Support
    Colligo

    New Dawn of SharePoint Apps or “How I Learned to Love No-Code Apps”

    Level: 100
    Track: IT Pro, Developer, End-User, Business
    As we move to the cloud with Azure and Office 365, the world of SharePoint development has changed. No longer are developers using server-side or Sandbox solutions on the servers. Instead, they are building cloud apps that either run on other providers like Azure or AWS or the apps run on the client-side, in your browser. However, with new systems like Flow, Power Apps, and Logic Apps within Azure, many systems that people relied on developers to create are now being built by power users. We will actually go through some simple apps and workflows in Power Apps, Flow and Azure Logic Apps.

    Speaker(s)

    Jared Shockley

    Sr. Service Engineer
    Microsoft

    O365: Learn to Fly

    Level: 200
    Track: IT Pro, End-User, Business
    Learn to Fly. Although one of my favourite Foo Fighters songs, its also a sentiment I really like when talking about end-user adoption. O365 is being rolled out worldwide to organizations of all sizes. Although each is unique and has different needs, they all have one thing in common: the need for end-user adoption. One of the key aspects of O365 is collaboration and the numerous services that are deployed to support it. Ironically, although many of the features are built with ease of use in mind, if you’ve ever watched a first-time user of O365 you’ll soon realize it’s not always intuitive for end-users to know how it all works together. To realize the benefits of O365, we need to ensure it is fully adopted across the organization and second-nature in users’ day-to-day collaborative work processes. Although you can take the “wing it/organic” approach, you may not get the results you are hoping for. What are some strategies and tactics you can use to stack the odds in your favour for a high degree of adoption in your organization? I’ll share my 3-step strategy and some specific tactics for each so your end-users can fly with O365!

    Speaker(s)

    Joanne Klein

    SharePoint/O365 Consultant
    NexNovus

    Office 365 Groups Boot Camp

    Level: 200
    Track: IT Pro, End-User, Business

    The introduction of Office 365 Groups has created waves in recent months. As the adoption of Groups begins to grow and the offering matures, numerous individuals have begun to ask: “How do I manage groups?” “Are groups different from Teams?” “Is Yammer obsolete?” Excitement about new features comes mixed with concerns on how to incorporate Groups, combining Groups with existing business workloads and the other functionality of Office 365.

    This is a 100-200 level session focusing on everything you need to know to get started with Groups and how to avoid the top pitfalls in the early stages of adoption.

    Speaker(s)

    Sag Baruss

    Senior Solutions Architect, AvePoint Client Services
    AvePoint Canada

    Power BI for the Faint of Heart – Building an Interactive Report Step-by-Step!

    Level: 100
    Track: IT Pro, Developer, End-User, Business
    You’ve heard about Power BI, and you’ve seen it, but you haven’t yet rolled up your sleeves and got your hands dirty. It looks like it is really easy, but sometimes it helps to have someone step you through it the first time to help you hit the ground running. We will grab various public data sources, join them together in a model and build an interactive pièce de ré·sis·tance on the visual design surface!

    Product Management in SharePoint and Office 365 end to end process

    Level: 200
    Track: IT Pro, Business
    Introduction – What is Product Management in most of the organizations?
    Business Need – Where is the pain? What is not connected? Where is the data overflow?
    Process Flow – How can we do it in SharePoint and other O365 tools?
    Demo
    IT Product Management life-cycle and SharePoint

    Speaker(s)

    Yana Berkovich

    BI, BA, SharePoint and O365 expert
    BCHousing

    Quick! Build me an intranet … and make it so that everyone loves it

    Level: 200
    Track: IT Pro, Developer, End-User, Business
    Many of us are familiar with this part “Build me an intranet”
    Many hope that everyone will love it, but how do you make sure?
    This session will focus on tools and techniques to effectively engage your stakeholders in prototyping of your own brilliant intranet

    SharePoint, DevOps and you.

    Level: 200
    Track: IT Pro, Developer
    Perhaps you’ve been hearing this DevOps buzzword and wondering “What the heck is that”, maybe the boss wants you to “do DevOps”. Maybe you just need to be able to do more with less in your day to day.
    Come listen to Gavin share some of his insights from running long term customer engagements and let him share some of the tools his team uses in their projects.

    Speaker(s)

  • Is it possible to do devops with the SharePoint framework ?

    Level: 200
    Track: Developer
    You had it all right with solutions and add-ins. Your release pipeline was set up. Do new technologies and methodologies mean starting over?
    Don’t panic I’m here to help! Together we’ll see how to set up a devops pipeline for SPFX developments with:
    –    Automated builds
    –    Automated deployments
    –    Automated tests
    –    Code quality checks
    There will be a lot of demonstrations during this session and we’ll be mostly using Visual Studio Team Services/Team Foundation Server.
    This session is mostly meant for develops, architects, quality assurance people…

    Speaker(s)

    Vincent BIRET

    Office 365 and Azure developer
    2toLead

    An Introduction to Azure Functions for SharePoint/Office 365 developers

    Level: 300
    Track: Developer

    Heard the hype around serverless architectures and Azure Functions? Come to this session to hear about what they are, how to get started, and understand the scenarios where they are most powerful.

    This session will show scenarios that will be extremely useful for SharePoint/Office 365 developers around Microsoft Graph webhooks, scheduled timer jobs, and much more!

    Speaker(s)

    Jeremy Thake

    VP Product Development
    Hyperfish

    New Dawn of SharePoint Apps or “How I Learned to Love No-Code Apps”

    Level: 100
    Track: IT Pro, Developer, End-User, Business
    As we move to the cloud with Azure and Office 365, the world of SharePoint development has changed. No longer are developers using server-side or Sandbox solutions on the servers. Instead, they are building cloud apps that either run on other providers like Azure or AWS or the apps run on the client-side, in your browser. However, with new systems like Flow, Power Apps, and Logic Apps within Azure, many systems that people relied on developers to create are now being built by power users. We will actually go through some simple apps and workflows in Power Apps, Flow and Azure Logic Apps.

    Speaker(s)

    Jared Shockley

    Sr. Service Engineer
    Microsoft

    Power BI for the Faint of Heart – Building an Interactive Report Step-by-Step!

    Level: 100
    Track: IT Pro, Developer, End-User, Business
    You’ve heard about Power BI, and you’ve seen it, but you haven’t yet rolled up your sleeves and got your hands dirty. It looks like it is really easy, but sometimes it helps to have someone step you through it the first time to help you hit the ground running. We will grab various public data sources, join them together in a model and build an interactive pièce de ré·sis·tance on the visual design surface!

    Quick! Build me an intranet … and make it so that everyone loves it

    Level: 200
    Track: IT Pro, Developer, End-User, Business
    Many of us are familiar with this part “Build me an intranet”
    Many hope that everyone will love it, but how do you make sure?
    This session will focus on tools and techniques to effectively engage your stakeholders in prototyping of your own brilliant intranet

    SharePoint and the Story of the Mutant Frog

    Level: 100
    Track: Developer, End-User, Business

    Once upon a time, there lived a sad mutant frog who felt he had no purpose in life. Until one day, he was discovered by the SharePoint team to give magical High Fives to employees throughout the land. Everyone rejoiced about how simple it was to recognize their fellow workers and everyone lived happily ever after using SharePoint.

    Follow Tom as he tells the story of how they used SharePoint to develop a recognition and rewards program for their company. They took a stated need from the business and brainstormed a solution from concept to theme to functionality in 30 minutes. Less than 24 hours later, they were demoing the site for the business owners. With our mutant frog giving out “High Fives”, the feedback was overwhelming positive, and the site is now available for use to over 5000 employees.

    In this session, you will learn:

    – How to set up your team and the mindset you need to have to be able to effectively brainstorm
    – How to develop a theme for your site that helps drive adoption
    – How to build the initial recognition list and custom form using out-of-the-box SharePoint components
    – How to set up the workflows and dashboards
    – How to keep the site fresh by delivering continual incremental improvements

    Delivering business value doesn’t have to take months and be dull or boring. With SharePoint and a bit of magic, you can have fun and find your own mutant frog.

    Speaker(s)


    SharePoint Framework, Angular & Azure Functions : The modern SharePoint developer tool belt.

    Level: 300
    Track: Developer

    Things are moving fast. Sometimes you might even feel that you own comfort zone is getting of control. But in a Mobile-First, Cloud-First world, things are changing to a crazy pace and to stay on the top of your game, you need keep up with the latest and greatest technologies that are available out there. By staying up to date, you will give to yourself new options that will let you be more productive, write better code and push you in a more open and more collaborative world.

    With the official shipment of Angular 2 and the current preview release of the SharePoint Framework, it is now the time to start moving towards those new technologies in your SharePoint Solutions.

    In this session, we will cover the modern tool belt of the SharePoint developer by covering the SharePoint Framework as the new surface to express yourself, Angular as a Framework to enable you to build complete applications within your SharePoint modern experiences and Azure Function as the perfect server-side companion for all your Office 365 & Azure development.

    This very demo-intensive session will make sure that at the end you get those 3 key takeaways :

    – Understand the role of the SharePoint Framework, Angular and Azure Functions in this Cloud-First, Mobile-First world
    – Have a complete sample where the modern tool belt is relevant and useful in a real-world scenario
    – Change the way you will think for your next SharePoint project

    Speaker(s)

    Sebastien Levert

    Product Evangelist & Partner Manager | Office Servers & Services MVP
    Valo Intranet

    SharePoint, DevOps and you.

    Level: 200
    Track: IT Pro, Developer
    Perhaps you’ve been hearing this DevOps buzzword and wondering “What the heck is that”, maybe the boss wants you to “do DevOps”. Maybe you just need to be able to do more with less in your day to day.
    Come listen to Gavin share some of his insights from running long term customer engagements and let him share some of the tools his team uses in their projects.

    Speaker(s)


    So you want to be a SharePoint Developer, In ~60 minutes you can become a SharePoint Padawan.

    Level: 100
    Track: Developer
    In this session we will dive into the information that you will need to be a successful developer for SharePoint. Whether you are a seasoned .Net developer or a Web developer of any sort we will cover the basics of SharePoint Development and all the options available to you. By the end of this session you will have a firm understanding of how to get started developing on SharePoint and you will be, a SharePoint Padawan.

    Speaker(s)

    Ryan Schouten

    Senior Software Architect
    ZAACT

    The New World of Branding: Creating Beautiful UI in SharePoint Online without MasterPages

    Level: 200
    Track: Developer
    Gone are the days of creating MasterPages to transform SharePoint Sites with beautiful branding. In this session we’ll explore Microsoft’s best practices of using client side development to manipulate your site. Go beyond basic colours and logos and look at how we can ensure SharePoint reflects the organizations brand and stands out with a glossy look that will satisfy any Communications team.

    Speaker(s)


    Use Office UI Fabric React to Build Beauty with SharePoint

    Level: 200
    Track: Developer

    When Microsoft released the Office UI Fabric, they enabled SharePoint developers to quickly build custom webparts, controls and applications that could inherit the innate look and feel of Office 365 and SharePoint with simple to use structured code. With Office UI Fabric React, we can quickly build sophisticated controls, tightly bound to SharePoint, such as command bars, color pickers, people pickers, panels, buttons and much more all tied in with React, the default rendering engine for the SharePoint Framework.

    In this session we will introduce the Office UI Fabric and learn how to use include it in our current or next SharePoint projects. After a quick introduction of the basics and how to get started, we will dig into code samples so as to see we can build our own applications that look to be a part of SharePoint.

    Benefits of this Session:

    • Overview of Office UI Fabric
    • Learn how to use Office UI Fabric with React to leverage repeatable components and controls.
    • See how you can begin using Office UI Fabric React now

    Speaker(s)

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Preview of smart diagrams for Visio

Although first announced back in October, i’d like to bring awareness to the following awesomeness coming from the Visio team. They are still looking for people to try out the new smart diagrams feature and provide valuable feedback:

Introducing early preview of smart diagrams from Visio for Windows

We are pleased to announce an early preview of smart diagrams for the first time in Visio, brought to you exclusively by the Office Insider Program. To preview and give your feedback directly to the team, sign up for smart diagrams today!

Do you currently spend hours connecting shapes, placing the shapes into the right Swim lanes to create the perfect layout? Looking to save time while creating your process diagrams from data every day?

With Visio’s smart diagrams feature, now you can automatically create a Basic Flowchart or Cross-Functional Flowchart from your process map in Excel, in no time. The process metadata you capture in Excel now gets stored in Visio shapes as shape data for you.
Smart Diagram

The preview will be open to all Office Insiders. If you are not a part of the Office Insider Program,  you can still get access to the early preview by signing up. Once you sign up, we can help you with onboard with the rest.

Note: The feature preview scope is *limited*. We are always working to improve our feature to make it the best version possible, and greatly appreciate your comments and feedback.

What happens after I sign up?
Once you’ve signed up for the early preview,  we will

  1. Contact you with next steps when the preview build is available
  2. Share Excel data templates with you, where you can display your process activities in relation to each other in an organized and structured way.
  3. Once you’ve populated the data template with your process data, it can be imported in Visio to automatically create a data driven Basic Flowchart/ Cross-Functional Flowchart.
Is the preview available in many languages?
Currently, it’s is only available in English-US. We hope to expand to other languages in the near future and are exploring our International options widely
How do I send feedback about the feature?
We want to hear from you about your experience with. Please write to us at vizsdep[at]microsoft[dot]com.If you have some great ideas for Visio then visit Visio UserVoice forum to provide suggestions and vote on ideas that others have already submitted.
I’m new to Visio but am interested. Where can I learn more?
I don’t have a Visio License, can I still try out the feature?

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Troubleshooting MS Office Install issues (MSI & Click-to-Run)

Here’s a shortlist of some useful troubleshooting techniques, divided into two sections according to the two main types of MS Office Installations:

MSI: “Traditional” Windows installer
Click-to-Run: Office 365 installed MS Office

MS Office MSI Install Troubleshooting

“Verbose logging” is a setting that exposes more information during the installation process. It will capture “warning” as well as “error” messages that provide us with clues to your problem. To do onetime verbose logging:

Diagnosing When Setup Stops Responding At times, Office Setup stops responding (hangs), and you do not receive any error message. The best thing to do in this situation is to restart your computer, and run Office Setup again with complete verbose logging turned on (with one additional option). To do this, start Office Setup. To do so, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, and then click Run.
  2. In the Open box, type the following command line, and then click OK:

pathSetup.exe /L*v! C:Verboselog.txt

Note that Path is the full path of your Office source location.

To enable Windows Installer logging yourself, open the registry with Regedit.exe and create the following path and keys:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SoftwarePolicies\Microsoft\WindowsInstaller

Reg_SZ: Logging Value: voicewarmupx

The letters in the value field can be in any order. Each letter turns on a different logging mode. Each letter’s actual function is as follows for MSI version 1.1:

v – Verbose output
o – Out-of-disk-space messages
i – Status messages
c – Initial UI parameters
e – All error messages
w – Non-fatal warnings
a – Start up of actions
r – Action-specific records
m – Out-of-memory or fatal exit information
u – User requests
p – Terminal properties
+ – Append to existing file
! – Flush each line to the log
x – Extra debugging information. The “x” flag is available only on Windows Server 2003 and later operating systems, and on the MSI redistributable version 3.0, and on later versions of the MSI redistributable.
“*” – Wildcard, log all information except for the v and the x option. To include the v and the x option, specify “/l*vx”.

Note This should be used only for troubleshooting purposes and should not be left on because it will have adverse effects on system performance and disk space. Each time you use the Add/Remove Programs tool in Control Panel, a new Msi*.log file is created.

When looking through the MSI logs we will typically want to look for a value 3 entry in the logs. Windows installer returns codes during the install which will indicate if a particular function was successful or not.

Value 1 = Success
Value 2 = Cancel
Value 3 = Error

Note: make sure to turn off verbose logging after you are done.

Enable verbose logging before collecting the log files.

  1. Click on Start -> All Programs
  2. Accessories -> RUN
  3. Type reg add HKLMSOFTWARE\Microsoft\ClickToRun\OverRide /v LogLevel /t REG_DWORD /d 3
  4. Click on OK.

Now try to install Microsoft Office 2016 to get the error message so that the log files get created.

Follow the steps below to access the ‘Temp’ folder.

  1. Click on Start -> All Programs
  2. Accessories -> RUN
  3. Type %temp%  -> Click on OK

The following are the log files that may be present in the %windir%temp folder (c2r is for Click to Run):

Bootstrapper*.log
c2r_*.log
C2RIntegrator*.log
Firefly*.log
Integratedoffice.exe_c2r*.log
Interceptor*.log
*.exe.log
*_c2rdll*

For MSI, “Normal”, installations the log files will look like MSI****.LOG

Further References:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2545723 – “Fix Its” to turn logging on and off
http://blogs.technet.com/b/odsupport/archive/2010/12/30/trouble shooting-office-installation-failures.aspx Office 2003-2010, analyse log
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/223300 – “Fix It” enable XP, Server 2003-8
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/826511 – help interpretting logs
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc978342.aspx

MS Office Click-To-Run Install Troubleshooting

The following steps show you how to enable verbose logging to help you troubleshooting Office 365 install/update failures.

To enable verbose logging, launch cmd as administrator and run the following command:

reg add HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ClickToRun\OverRide /v LogLevel /t REG_DWORD /d 3

ULS log file is created both in the %temp% folder and the %windir%\temp folder.  The file name is of the following format:

<machinename>-<date>-<time>.log

For example Keith-201420141610-1434.log.  Once these logs have been retrieved and analyzed, verbose logging should be disabled by running the following command from an administrative command-prompt:

reg delete HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ClickToRun\OverRide /v LogLevel /f

The log output is in ULS format.  Opening the log file in Excel will help you with filtering the data.  First, you want to look for is the term “unexpected”.  You can look for “Fail” and /or “Error”

When Attempting to Install Office 365 Directly from the Office Portal

Most end user issues with installing/activating Microsoft Office 365 from the Office Portal are proxy/firewall related.  Follow the steps above to review log files.

Process Monitor and Fiddler are also great tools to use for troubleshooting Office 365 ProPlus installation and activation errors. If possible, try to test using a less restricted proxy/firewall.  If the activation is successful on another network, you may need make adjustments to your proxy/firewall settings.

The following article can help you with determining the IP address and URL exceptions you might need to add:

Start by white listing or adding exceptions for the IP addresses and URLs under “Office 365 ProPlus”.  If you continue to have problems, add the URLs under the “Office 365 portal and identity” section.

If still have problems, try the following:

MS Office MSI Install Troubleshooting

“Verbose logging” is a setting that exposes more information during the installation process. It will capture “warning” as well as “error” messages that provide us with clues to your problem.

To do onetime verbose logging:

Diagnosing When Setup Stops Responding At times, Office Setup stops responding (hangs), and you do not receive any error message. The best thing to do in this situation is to restart your computer, and run Office Setup again with complete verbose logging turned on (with one additional option). To do this, start Office Setup. To do so, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, and then click Run.
  2. In the Open box, type the following command line, and then click OK:

pathSetup.exe /L*v! C:Verboselog.txt

Note that Path is the full path of your Office source location.

To enable Windows Installer logging yourself, open the registry with Regedit.exe and create the following path and keys:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SoftwarePolicies\Microsoft\WindowsInstaller

Reg_SZ: Logging Value: voicewarmupx

The letters in the value field can be in any order. Each letter turns on a different logging mode. Each letter’s actual function is as follows for MSI version 1.1:

v – Verbose output
o – Out-of-disk-space messages
i – Status messages
c – Initial UI parameters
e – All error messages
w – Non-fatal warnings
a – Start up of actions
r – Action-specific records
m – Out-of-memory or fatal exit information
u – User requests
p – Terminal properties
+ – Append to existing file
! – Flush each line to the log
x – Extra debugging information. The “x” flag is available only on Windows Server 2003 and later operating systems, and on the MSI redistributable version 3.0, and on later versions of the MSI redistributable.
“*” – Wildcard, log all information except for the v and the x option. To include the v and the x option, specify “/l*vx”.

Note This should be used only for troubleshooting purposes and should not be left on because it will have adverse effects on system performance and disk space. Each time you use the Add/Remove Programs tool in Control Panel, a new Msi*.log file is created.

When looking through the MSI logs we will typically want to look for a value 3 entry in the logs. Windows installer returns codes during the install which will indicate if a particular function was successful or not. Value 1 = Success Value 2 = Cancel Value 3 = Error

Note: make sure to turn off verbose logging after you are done.

Enable verbose logging before collecting the log files.

  1. Click on Start -> All Programs
  2. Accessories -> RUN
  3. Type reg add HKLMSOFTWARE\Microsoft\ClickToRun\OverRide /v LogLevel /t REG_DWORD /d 3
  4. Click on OK.

Now try to install Microsoft Office 2016 to get the error message so that the log files get created.

Follow the steps below to access the ‘Temp’ folder.

  1. Click on Start -> All Programs
  2. Accessories -> RUN
  3. Type %temp%  -> Click on OK

The following are the log files that may be present in the %windir%temp folder (c2r is for Click to Run):

Bootstrapper*.log
c2r_*.log
C2RIntegrator*.log
Firefly*.log
Integratedoffice.exe_c2r*.log
Interceptor*.log
*.exe.log
*_c2rdll*

For MSI, “Normal”, installations the log files will look like MSI****.LOG

Open the command prompt (run as administrator), and use the following command to import the manual proxy settings from IE:

netsh winhttp import proxy source=ie

Now rerun the install/update

To reset winhttp back, run the following command:

netsh winhttp reset proxy

Most failed installs directly from the Office portal that are proxy related, usually fail pretty quick and usually with an error like this:

“Sorry, we ran into a problem Go online for additional help. Error Code: 30174-4.”

Or When attempting to update a client that is looking to the Office portal for updates will get something like this:

“Something went Wrong: We’re sorry, we ran into a problem while downloading updates for Office. Please check your network connection and try again later. Error Code: 30088-28 or 30088-27”

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Archetonomy Mega Drop Down Review

Having usable and accurate navigation is essential to the success of your SharePoint site. SharePoint’s default navigation can be used to create concise main navigation menus, and can even support taxonomy via Managed Navigation. Visually & functionally, however, you’re limited to a simple 4-level deep flyout/dropdown menu for the main navigation. In the side Quick Launch menus, hierarchy can be implied with simple indenting of the text links.

In both of those main navigation areas of SharePoint, the out-of-the-box experience does have some definite UI and UX constraints.

The Mega menus concept

Now, mega menus are probably well familiar to anyone and everyone by now- it was an up and coming design trend back in the late 2000’s. Old hat – but let’s review the fundamentals of this design pattern first:

Typically, a mega menu:

  • is a single drop-down that appears on hover
  • shows all the options in one large panel
  • groups options into related categories
  • uses icons or other graphics to help the user.

They can succeed because:

  • They offer a good compromise between simple and expanding menus.
  • They are easy to use and should suffer fewer accessibility problems.
  • They can condense a lot of information architecture artifacts into a small amount of screen real estate

Mega menus done right
Mega menus gone WRONG
Mega menu best practices
Mega menus in Ecommerce – design Trends from 2011 vs 2014

Now, in the SharePoint world, there arose a number of solutions to be able to implement mega menu-style navigation systems in response to the growing demand. Some examples:

SharePoint Mega Menu from a DVWP and a List
BindTuning – How to use BindTuning’s Mega  Menu
Mega Menu for SharePoint

Finally, here’s a gallery of some SharePoint sites using mega menus, which are either custom coded or leveraging commercial mega menus:
SharePoint sites using mega menus

There are a plethora of other articles, posts and products relating to mega menus & SharePoint, for sure this particular links list could be a couple screens long. The vast majority do require a good knowledge of Javascript/CSS custom code, so in this review i’m focusing on the one commercial product I know of that offers a good compromise between ease of use and technical functionality.

The Archetonomy Solution

mdd2-pro-search

The Archetonomy Mega Menu system is a farm solution for on-premise SharePoint 2010, 2013 & 2016, and has the broadest feature set of  any 3rd party solution that I know of in this vein for SharePoint. After positive experiences with the product, I figure it’s time to give it a review.

Pros

  • Comprehensive What-You-See-Is-What-You-Get administration/design interface
  • Styles can be applied ad-hoc, with inline or formalized CSS, or a combination of both
  • Import/Export of menu configuration as an XML file eases transitioning to different environments
  • Design workflow flexibility: Power users & less technical stakeholders can do initial mock-ups with the visual designer directly in the GUI, and then hand it over to a front-end developer to formalize CSS later

Cons

  • While the drag and drop and visual design surface (which shows real-time X/Y coordinates of menu elements) increases efficiency and overall ease of use, it’s tedious to get everything to line up pixel-perfect when doing manual designs. What would really help is the ability to select multiple elements and align them left/right/top with one click, as can be done in programs like Visio, Photoshop etc.
  • Archetonomy Megamenus are currently only for on-premise SharePoint. Office 365 SharePoint Online is not currently supported. I did hear that a SharePoint Online version might be in the works but have not seen an update about that.

Dynamic Content

  • Links & content in the menu can be displayed dynamically, either individually or in sections, based on:
    • Content search queries, for example:
      • query selects the top 10 most downloaded documents from the HR department
      • selects results based on what logged In user is currently viewing the page (e.g. the last 10 documents I personally accessed)
    • Managed Metadata tagged content: the hierarchy of words that reflects organizational structure, business units & concepts can be reflected in the menu
    • Managed Navigation (TermStore): The specialized portion of Managed Metadata that is focused on site navigation, can be used. This gives special advantages like being able to use “friendly” URL’s.
    • SharePoint list managed navigation (with folder grouping): Standard SharePoint Lists can be used as the place where links are added. This gives the special advantage that the admin can assign certain user permissions to edit that list, allowing isolation of edit rights for the overall menu:
      • For example, the admin could add a section of links in the Marketing Department section of the main menu, which draws its data from a SharePoint list in the Marketing Departments site collection. A user in Marketing with basic training on how to work with SharePoint Lists, could be delegated access to be able to add/edit/remove links from that SharePoint List. This user would not be able to edit anything else in the main menu system other than the links generated by their specific SP List.
    • Three-level hierarchy (List Panels): It’s possible to maximize “screen real estate” and offer a richer selection of content, by adding an interactive Panel bar section. When a user clicks on a horizontal link section, the related content area displays in the same dropdown. In this way we can multiply the amount of content that can be displayed in single, fixed size menu dropdown area:
    • Publishing Pages: When this section is added to menu, it will automatically display all pages in the current Sites Publishing Pages Library, which is the standard place where SharePoint Publishing Pages are created. This makes it simple to render the most typical type of SharePoint CMS content.
    • Audiences, which are predefined groups that users can be added into, for example a typical use case could be “New Hires”, whereby any user in that group is shown menu content & links focused on onboarding topics.
  • Search input boxes can be added anywhere inside the dropdown menu, with the search boxes optionally sending users to specialized search results pages. For example, a search input box inside a HR Department menu dropdown, could send the user to a search results page focused only on HR-related content

Design & Ease of Use

  • Standardized CSS can be used, for example as part of a Branding Solution. In this way, when one adds a new links or content, it can already by default inherit the overall corporate branding styles.
  • Content and site designers can design and create menus directly in the browser without needing to write HTML or CSS
  • Although designing and building menus with Mega Drop Down for SharePoint is not difficult, building highly functional menus requires several skillsets. While the same person can represent many of these skillsets, identifying these roles upfront will further increase your menu’s adoption rate:
    • Information Architect – Responsible for understanding what content exists within your site and defining what options are available for accessing content.
    • UI Designer – Responsible for designing an intuitive and effective interface.
    • UI Developer – Responsible for implementing the design. This person is typically responsible for building the HTML and CSS.
    • Menu Administrator – Responsible for managing the links and updating navigation content.
      • Menu Sub-Administrators– Users in the organization who are granted selective access to add or edit only certain portions of the menu, such as a user in the Marketing Department given access to edit just links & content in that section of the menu

License Manager Installation Guide
Mega Drop Down Installation and User Guide
Product Release Notes
Video Tutorials

 

Conclusion

Although it’s a shame there’s not a SharePoint Online version of this, it’s still a powerful menu system for those with on-premise SharePoint. The ability to visually design the menu layouts and content is a big win, especially for rapid prototyping – although one needs to consider carefully how much the design should be controlled by manual activities vs how much should be put on rails by creating formal CSS rules.

Being able to add complex controls like Search Inputs, or deliver link content based on Content Search queries can help create truly useful navigation systems. With mega menu powers, comes mega responsibilities: putting everything including the kitchen sink into a menu navigation system also can create it’s own user experience issues, so one has to to be mindful that underlying usability is paid attention to.

 

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Use Microsoft Flow to grab image of the day for SharePoint

The default Search Center in SharePoint is quite minimalist- just an empty page layout with a search box. This post will show you how to use the workflow logic of Microsoft Flow to grab a reference to the Bing image of the day, copy it’s URL to a SharePoint list, and then use clientside scripting to set the image as a background to your search center or use elsewhere in your portal.

There’s been plenty of tutorials posted over the years in terms of SP image rotaters, jazzing up search centers, etc. – the focus of this post is really more about using Flow to parse external RSS data into a SharePoint list on an ongoing basis, and then do something with that data.

1. Create the SharePoint List

In order to not have to query an external RSS feed every time a user hits a page where we want to display referenced images, we’re going to use a SharePoint list as a repository for the image links as they come in each day.

  • In your SharePoint site collection of choice (in this case, i’m using the root site collection), create a new Custom List with the name “Daily Images”. There’s no extra columns or tweaks needed for this List, we’re just going to be using the OOTB Title field to store our daily image URL and that’s it.
    Need help creating a List?:
    -If you’re using the new SharePoint UI style (Lists, Libraries & Subsites listed on “Site Contents” page are text links), these are the instructions.
    -If you’re using the legacy SharePoint UI style (Lists, Libraries & Subsites listed on “Site Contents” page are square, “metro”-style icons), follow these steps.

2. Create the Flow

  • You haven’t checked out Microsoft Flow yet? Come on, get on it – it’s the future of workflow! Head on over and sign up with your Microsoft or organizational Office 365 account.
  • Browse the Templates and locate the “RSS to SharePoint” template by Craig Stanley (thanks Craig!). Click “Use this template”.
  • For the “When a feed item is published” URL, input your image RSS feed URL, e.g. http://feeds.feedburner.com/bingimageswhen-a-feed-item-is-published-microsoft-flow
  • A particularity of this specific RSS feed, is that some image URL’s it was outputting (with “feedproxy” in the URL) we’re not rendering when linked to, so I used the “Add a Condition” link to create a Flow Condition that only registered image links in the RSS feed, that do not contain the string “feedproxy”. For the true part of the Condition, you’re going to have it run the Create SharePoint List Item action, using the URL of the image from the RSS feed for the Title field:
    add-a-condition-create-list-item-microsoft-flow
  • It’ll take the flow a bit to pick up some data, so if it’s a daily RSS feed check back the next day. When it’s working and there’s no problems reported in the log, you should see some RSS image URL links showing up like so:
    daily-images-list-items

3. Add some script to render the images

We’re going to use Jquery and some of the SharePoint REST API to query our Daily Images list, and grab the latest image. We’re going to run with the assumption you already have your Jquery reference set up. If you don’t have Jquery in there already, you can either bake it into your page layouts (if you’re using custom branding) like this, or add a one-off reference on the page where you’re embedding this Daily Image code, like in this example.

Go to your Search Center homepage (https://yourTenant.SharePoint.com/Search by default), Edit the page, and add a Script Editor web part with the following code. It renders the latest image of the day as the CSS background image of the #DeltaPlaceHolderMain div. Note that we are doing a string replace to change the original image URL’s provided via the RSS feed, which just happened to be non-SSL http://. Since we’re displaying this image on a secure SharePoint Online page, we’re changing the http:// to https://. Bing, in this case, serves both versions happily- not all image sources may play along like this so double-check they can render https:// before committing.

<script type="text/javascript">
var Module = {} || Module;

Module.GetImages = (function () {
    var pub = {},
        _images = [],      
        _options = {
            listName: "Daily Images"
        };

    pub.init = function () {
        var url = "https://yourTenant.sharepoint.com/_api/lists/getbytitle('" + listName + "')/items?$top=1&$orderby=Created desc"
        $.ajax({
            url: url,
            type: "GET",
            headers: {
                "accept": "application/json;odata=verbose",
            },
            success: function (results) { createImageView(results, listName); },
            error: function (error) { 
                console.log("Error in getting List: " + listName); 
                $(_options.container).html("Error retrieving your " + listName + ".");
            }
        });   
    };

    function createImageView(results, listName) {
        _images = results.d.results;

        $.each(_images, function (index, task) {
			var imageURL = task.Title;
			imageURL = imageURL.replace("http:","https:");
			$('#DeltaPlaceHolderMain').css('background-image', 'url(' + imageURL + ')');
			$('#DeltaPlaceHolderMain').css('background-repeat', 'no-repeat');
			$('#DeltaPlaceHolderMain').css('background-position', 'center');	
        });
    }

    function _onQueryFailed(sender, args) {
        alert('Request failed. \nError: ' + args.get_message() + '\nStackTrace: ' + args.get_stackTrace());
    }

    return pub;
}());

$(document).ready(function () {
    SP.SOD.executeFunc('sp.js', 'SP.ClientContext', function () {
        Module.GetImages.init();
    });
});
</script>

When all is working, you’re going to get a new Bing image of the day each day, as the background to your search center page:
search-center

This technique could be applied to any instance where there’s a list of images delivered by an RSS feed, for example:
NASA Image of the Day
Flickr daily interesting image
Wikimedia Image of the Day
..etc.

For the Bing Image and any other source, make sure to check that you’re obeying the copyright & author attribution & usage requirements of the image provider – the above technique implies nothing about such nuances, it’s only intended as a technical proof of concept/demo.

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What is Office 365? Two simple & current Infographics

You just know you’re in a complex business when even having a good oversight of the major tangents of what you do, is hard to come come by. In Office 365, we have a lot of new services being added on to plumbing/infrastructure backbone of the already massive SharePoint framework.

Conversely, recent changes to SharePoint itself have consolidated some of the user experience scenarios, addressing BIG day to day problems for information workers – file collaboration, CMS-style content publishing and getting away from a “one-size fits all” intranet scenario.

So what IS the mile high perspective? Naming the services is one thing, but showing their intended relationship with each other is crucial. It’s said you don’t really understand something unless you can explain it in simple terms-  here’s two awesome takes on it:

 Image provided by Christophe Fiessinger Office 365 product manager, you can find him on Twitter at https://twitter.com/cfiessinger

..and here’s a different perspective, from Ben at ShareGate:

What's in Office 365 infographic

Crafted by: Sharegate, The SIMPLEST Office 365 and SharePoint Security & Management tool suite.

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roadmap

How to output the Office 365 Roadmap as a spreadsheet

If you want to stay on top of what’s coming soon for Office 365, the Office blog will be the source for major announcements, but you’ll also want to keep an eye on the Office 365 roadmap – which also covers Office Online and Outlook.com. If the Office blog is going to cover a feature, the news will be there first, but smaller features may only be covered in the roadmap.
roadmap-650-80

A bit of a friction I’ve run into quite a bit, is that because there’s so much goodness in the pipeline that it’s kind of clunky to try and advise people as to what’s on deck, what’s been launched and everything in between – clearly some of the major new feature sets getting launched are pretty hard to miss as there will generally be a major post on the Office blogs about it. However, often the peripheral improvements are useful to have good optics on.

Everyone loves tabular data, so let’s get this sucker into a spreadsheet so we can crunch the data easier!

Due to the number of features in the mix, it’s kind of essential to get the info from those two sources into a spreadsheet to be able to crunch it and also track it in the long term (monitor for changes).

I used a few Chrome Extensions, primarily “Data Scraper”, whipped up the XPath formulas required and exported as CSV.

Chrome Extensions Used:
Data Scraper: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/scraper/nndknepjnldbdbepjfgmncbggmopgden?utm_source=chrome-app-launcher-info-dialog
Recipe Creator: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/recipe-creator/icadidhenmiokjlmpdgjikdoknhfgkhg?utm_source=chrome-app-launcher-info-dialog
Xpath Helper: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/xpath-helper/hgimnogjllphhhkhlmebbmlgjoejdpjl?utm_source=chrome-app-launcher-info-dialog

Here’s the Data Scraper rules I used – the XPath pattern used is to define the main repeating container of info, then divvy up the contents as they will be added as columns in Excel:

Container: //article/div[2]/div/div/div[1]/div
Status: ../../../div[1]/div[1][contains(@class, “feature-group”)]/div[1]
Title: ./div[1]/div[1]
Description: ./div[2]/div[1]
Link: ./div[2]/div[2]/div[1]/div[contains(@class, “feature-item__more-info”)]/a[1]/@href
Category 1: ./div[2]/div[2]/div[1]/div[contains(@class, “feature-item__tag”)][1]
Category 2: ./div[2]/div[2]/div[1]/div[contains(@class, “feature-item__tag”)][2]
Category 3: ./div[2]/div[2]/div[1]/div[contains(@class, “feature-item__tag”)][3]
Image: ./div[2]/div[3]/div[contains(@class, “feature-image clear-fix col-md-12”)]/img[1]/@data-original

Note:
This article does not advocate automatically polling the Office 365 Roadmap page. No one likes bots hammering their pages – you are obligated to play nice according to Microsoft.com’s terms of use. This extensions/scripts described here work on the clientside browser only. Please manually download an offline copy of the page and do your work on that.

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Join the #CodeGeneration Movement

Building on Microsoft’s recent announcement to invest $75 million in community programs to increase access to computer science education for all youth worldwide, Microsoft Canada is launching the #codegeneration movement – to inspire Canadian youth (13 -18 year olds) to learn more about coding. #codegeneration will run from now until Computer Science Education Week (December 7-13). 

Join the Movement!

Help us spread the word and teach Canadian youth to create with technology. Anyone can code, it’s simple and easy.

  • Coding Challenges: For the next five weeks, Microsoft will be issuing coding challenges at www.CodeGeneration.ca. Students who complete these weekly challenges will have the chance to win points towards prizes while learning the basics of coding; and parents and teachers can find resources to help them lead students in these challenges themselves.
  • “Hour of Code” Sessions: As a founding corporate supporter of Code.org, Microsoft is offering free Preparation Webinars with live chat for questions and answers on November 24 and December 1.  Ready to hold your own Hour of Code with your students – download your toolkit today and lead them through a Minecraft tutorial.  Or schedule a field trip to a local Microsoft Retail Stores during Computer Science Education Week to give young developers the opportunity to learn coding. For more info, please visit the In-Store event section at a store near you.

Spread the word!

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